Playing VolleyBallInKC in a league at center middle school in Feb 2003, in just the third game, I went up for a block and came down with a BustedFinger. I could see that the guy was gonna crush the ball, but I was too macho to just let him do it. Or maybe it was just a good game, and I went up for this block as I would any other. In any case, he did crush the ball, off my block; as is usual, I called "touch!" to let me teammates know to chase the thing down... "and a half!" I added as I realized my left index finger was exploding in pain. I saw the ball was still up, headed for our setter, and I called for it, "gimme that thing!" The setter obliged and I managed to get up and spike it down to win the point before taking myself out of the game and to the E.R. To pass the time in the E.R., I took some "photos":http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/www-archive/2003Feb/0008.html with my WearableGizmo. The x-ray tech let me see the films. The fracture was plain to see, even to the untrained eye. I was glad I didn't take myself to the E.R. for some minor sprain. Then they gave me some ibuprofen and splinted it ("ahh.. much better"). The E.R. doctor referred me to a hand specialist; he was concerned it wouldn't heal right if left alone. I saw the hand specialist, Dr. K, around 11am the next day. He explained that this was a "challenging injury." If left alone, the muscled and ligaments would push the fractured bone out of place; it would heal, eventually, but I wouldn't be able to bend my finger. He advised doing a *reduction*, i.e. putting pins in to hold the bones in the right place while they heal. He might be able to do a closed reduction, but if that didn't work out, he'd have to open it up. We scheduled surgery for 5pm. Nothing to eat till then. Good thing I had a snack on the way over! Rather than a general anesthetic, we agreed on a "Bier block":http://www.nda.ox.ac.uk/wfsa/html/u01/u01_003.htm , where they basically squeeze most of the blood out of the arm, inject something to numb it, with a turniquet to keep the anesthetic from going elsewhere. So they did all that, plus put in an I.V. in my right arm. But as they started to work on my finger, I said "ouch!" So they turned a knob and said "we'll give you something to make you a little more sleepy..." "OK, we're done," was the next thing I heard. And it had gone well; no need to open up the finger. I was to come back after a week and he'd take off the surgical bandage and have a look. I took some more photos at that visit: <a href="http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/www-archive/2003Feb/0043.html">Busted finger update: pins!</a>. A favorite: <img src="http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/www-archive/2003Feb/att-0043/01-Photo_5.jpg" alt="pins!" />. You can still see the line where he would have cut if the closed reduction didn't work. I now had a splint that I could take off a few times a day for exercises. My next appointment with Dr. K was 11 Mar. He took the pins out -- with a vice grip! I felt like a piece of plumbing or something. But... ah... no more splint! I can type with 10 fingers again. Now (**13Mar2003**) it's a question of how much range of motion I recover as I do the torture^H^H^H^H therapy.